Skip Navigation Links
ICD Code: 493. Asthma



ICD Code: 493. Article Review
Title: Akinbami LJ et al; "Trends in Asthma Prevalence, Health Care Use, and Mortality in the United States, 2001-2010." NCHS Data Brief; No.94; 5/12; p1
      PREVALENCE (2001-2010): This report presents recent data for trends in asthma prevalence, health care encounters, and mortality in the United States. Asthma prevalence (the percentage of people who have ever been diagnosed with asthma and still have asthma) increased from 7.3% in 2001 to 8.4% in 2010. In 2010, an estimated 25.7 million people had asthma: 18.7 million adults aged 18 and over, and 7.0 million children aged 0-17 years. Children aged 0-17 years had higher asthma prevalence (9.5%) than adults aged 18 and over (7.7%) for the period 2008-2010. Females had higher asthma prevalence than males (9.2% compared with 7.0%).
      Among racial groups, persons of multiple race had the highest asthma prevalence (14.1%), while Asian persons had the lowest rates (5.2%). Persons of black (11.2%) and American Indian or Alaska Native (9.4%) races had higher asthma prevalence compared with white persons (7.7%). Among Hispanic groups, asthma prevalence was higher among persons of Puerto Rican (16.1%) than Mexican (5.4%) descent.
      Asthma prevalence was higher for groups with lower income-to-poverty level ratios: While 11.2% of those with incomes less than 100% of the poverty level had asthma, asthma prevalence was 8.7% for persons with incomes 100% to less than 200% of the poverty level, and 7.3% for persons with incomes at least 200% of the poverty level.
      HEALTH CARE UTILIZATION: Asthma visits in primary care settings (physician offices and hospital outpatient departments) per 100 persons with asthma declined from 2001 to 2009. Asthma emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations per 100 persons with asthma were stable from 2001 to 2009. The rates of health care encounters per 100 persons with asthma across all health care settings were similar for males and females, and for black and white persons, but the rate for children was higher than that for adults. Asthma encounter rates for each setting (primary care, ED, and hospital) were also similar for males and females. Asthma visit rates in primary care settings per 100 persons with asthma were similar for black and white persons. However, black persons had a higher asthma ED visit rate and a higher asthma hospitalization rate than white persons. Children aged 0-17 years with asthma had a higher asthma visit rate for primary care settings and a higher ED visit rate than adults aged 18 and over. Asthma hospitalization rates per 100 persons with asthma were similar between adults and children.
      MORTALITY: The asthma death rate per 1,000 persons with asthma was 0.15 for the period 2007-2009. Asthma death rates per 1,000 persons with asthma were more than 30% higher for females than males, 75% higher for black persons than white persons, and almost 7 times higher for adults than children. The highest rate was for adults aged 65 and over (0.58 per 1,000 persons with asthma). Asthma death rates per 1,000 persons with asthma declined from 2001 to 2009.

Search Criteria: Text - NCHS Data Brief; No.94; 5/12; p1